jtotheizzoe:

compoundchem:

Version 1 of ‘A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science’. Thanks for everyone’s suggestions earlier in the week, attempted to include as many of them as possible!
Download link here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ap

Approach the world with an open mind, but not so open that your brains fall out.
Here’s a list of tips on how to weigh good science from bad. Combine that with my video on “How to Read Science News" and you’ll be in pretty good shape and shall never be led astray: 

jtotheizzoe:

compoundchem:

Version 1 of ‘A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science’. Thanks for everyone’s suggestions earlier in the week, attempted to include as many of them as possible!

Download link here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ap

Approach the world with an open mind, but not so open that your brains fall out.

Here’s a list of tips on how to weigh good science from bad. Combine that with my video on “How to Read Science News" and you’ll be in pretty good shape and shall never be led astray: 

(Source: cinqfruits, via plagal)

sailon:

some science teacher humor

sailon:

some science teacher humor

Sand Storm From an Airplane

Sand Storm From an Airplane

(Source: sailon)

bpod-mrc:

22 January 2014
Eye Eye
When we see something, it’s because light comes into the eye and hits the back of the eyeball, known as the retina. The most pinpoint sharp region in the retina is called the macula, specialised for detailed tasks such as reading and recognising faces. By studying family trees, scientists have discovered an inherited condition called vitelliform macular dystrophy, or VMD. People with VMD have a build-up of fatty blobs in their macula, seen as the yellow spots in these images of the back of patient’s eyeballs, which eventually causes them to lose their sight. Researchers have now found a new gene fault responsible for VMD. The gene, called IMPG1, makes a protein that helps to stick together the light-sensing cells in the retina. But when it’s faulty, the connections break down and the blobs take over. This discovery provides new insights into VMD and hope for future therapies.
Written by Kat Arney
—
Image courtesy of Christian Hamel Institute for Neurosciences of Montpellier, France  Copyright Elsevier 2013 Research published in the American Journal of Human Genetics, August 2013

bpod-mrc:

22 January 2014

Eye Eye

When we see something, it’s because light comes into the eye and hits the back of the eyeball, known as the retina. The most pinpoint sharp region in the retina is called the macula, specialised for detailed tasks such as reading and recognising faces. By studying family trees, scientists have discovered an inherited condition called vitelliform macular dystrophy, or VMD. People with VMD have a build-up of fatty blobs in their macula, seen as the yellow spots in these images of the back of patient’s eyeballs, which eventually causes them to lose their sight. Researchers have now found a new gene fault responsible for VMD. The gene, called IMPG1, makes a protein that helps to stick together the light-sensing cells in the retina. But when it’s faulty, the connections break down and the blobs take over. This discovery provides new insights into VMD and hope for future therapies.

Written by Kat Arney

Image courtesy of Christian Hamel
Institute for Neurosciences of Montpellier, France
Copyright Elsevier 2013 
Research published in the American Journal of Human Genetics, August 2013

(via kayfrancis)

(Source: parttimebiologistfulltimeninja)